…on a jet plane

we are leaving…
for the Land of Enchantment…
for a reunion with dear friends,
a show opening
AND honeymoon,
all wrapped up in one.

The laundry is done…

the sheets

and folded…

The Last of the Summer Light

and the packing has begun. My artist’s eye is excited to experience new colors on the horizon, and my hard working fingers are looking forward to letting the brushes cool down for a bit.

A personal word of thanks to all who have sent such kind words to acknowledge our wedding announcement. It is just that sort of support which has brought us all forward and I have a deeper appreciation of the meaning of friendship because of you.

Ta for now,  H


Father and Daugher Portraits

Working quite late in the studio tonight, but I’m at this computer rather than at the easel. There’s a lot of “business” stuff to this full time artist deal and it allows me to stretch some other creative muscles. Tonight, it’s writing.

No, not this blog, Painter’s Notes. If you’re a regular reader of this blog, you will have found your way to this logo,

notesLink

It appears at the bottom left of each of the large format image pages, which are found when you click on a thumbnail in the Portfolio section of my website. The logo takes you to the little journal writing that I do for each painting. Long story, written up somewhere in the archives here, but for now, let’s just say that once I got started…I wasn’t allowed to stop.

I am not a writer, and the “I have to do the Painter’s Notes” task does tend to be put off until it can wait no longer. Tonight is that night. At least for the five new paintings that are going out to Santa Fe. Well, they have already arrived, ahead of our flight next week out to the land of enchantment.

As I begin, it puts a smile on my face to see the images of The Bogcutter and The Smock side by side…

The Bogcutter 72

The Smock

Our son Jon, and his daughter Zoe.

Jon originally posed for this painting almost 5 years ago. Zoe is 4. She was just a twinkle in Papa’s eye when he hefted the bogcutter on his shoulders and let me sketch away. I’m so grateful now, for the reference photos I took way back then. Everybody changes over a five year time span, but I, unknowingly, caught him just before his life was to shift forever.

That painting sat on the back burner while I gathered up the courage to attempt an honest portrayal of someone I loved. Man it took guts, for me at least. The nudge of that AAC article was the extra shove I needed. That, and watching the passage of time move into warp speed.

The portrait of Zoe was a much more serendipitous affair. She simply wanted to paint next to her Mima. And when I got up to fetch her some clean water…it was all about the raking afternoon light. I wondered if a then 3 year old, would understand the concept of modeling. She loved trying out the new word and was so serious about her craft that the camera, clicking away behind her to capture the fleeting light in her hair, was no distraction. She was a natural at taking direction and held that dear little hand still so I could record the shadow on the dimple.

OK, now it’s later and I may not make it much longer tonight.
But, it’s a start. I’ll let you know when to click on that logo.


Tools of the Trade

By way of a bit of a nod and a thank you to both Follansbee and Chris Schwarz (Lost Art Press)   who have recently posted this portrait of Peter on their blogs…

The Master Carver's Tea 72

thereby flooding my humble website with new viewers…I throwdown this sneak peak at a brand new painting…

Tools of the Trade -  24 x 20

Tools of the Trade

There are lots of clues in this painting to the other works which will be on exhibit in just a few days at the Sugarman Peterson Gallery in Santa Fe. In the meantime, I’ve got some shipping and handling to do…and a fair amount of shavings to sweep up.

 

 

 

 


More on hubcaps, and more…

Hubcaps-preview-9-6-14---010-sbe_480

Looks like that Hubcap show, Second Time Around, at the Museum of the Shenandoah Valley is a huge success. They have had well over 2400 people through just on the first weekend.

The Exhibit will be up through March 1, 2015 and it would be a beautiful day trip around this time of year. They have produced a new video which I found interesting so I’ve made a link here…Click for Video

Meanwhile, my days are filled with wrapping and shipping two groups of paintings headed out west. The Sugarman Peterson Gallery show opens in less than two weeks…oh my…and Gallery 1261 is having a new show which opens later in October, more on that soon.

Then, I have a large batch of panels in mid-prep in the garage workshop. The electricians have lit up the place, and it has been wonderful to throw the big carriage doors open to the beautiful fall weather, turn up the tunes, and work the day away.

So, though I will not be picking up the brushes for at least the next month, I will be working just as hard at the “behind the scenes” business of making art.

Stay tuned and fire up those rakes.


Looking Back

Looking Backweb

One of the reasons that this painting is titled, “Looking Back”, is that these fishing vessels, and the small commercial industry that has flourished on the island of Martha’s Vineyard, are fading into history.
I was just reading the Vineyard Gazette and Mark Alan Lovewell has an article that caught my attention and made me take a second look at this painting.

I’ll attach a link to the article here….Click to read VG Article.

ml_four_kids

The article describes the transition from big sea dragging for fluke, which Tim Broderick and family were working with their boat, Four Kids, to Oyster farming in the nearby Menemsha Pond.
I like the forward thinking of their new venture, and, after years of mourning the decline of the big boats in Menemsha, I’m seeing new shingles going up, like the wholesale business of the Menemsha Fish House and I am hopeful that the village will continue to support the islanders.

I almost left that boat out. This composition required a lot of tweaking to get the major elements, buildings, boats and docks to line up, to fit on the panel and to be as close to reality as possible. In real life, those boats swap mooring positions daily, so it wasn’t too much of a stretch to nudge the Four Kids up a few feet and let her dock in front of Larson’s.

four kids detail

And now I’m glad I did. Seems like as fast as I can paint these vineyard scenes…life has a way of changing it all up anew.

The original oil painting, Looking Back  92″ x 48″  is available at the Granary Gallery, just up the road from where the boat is still flying it’s flag.


Ready for the next show …

spg announcement web

I am pleased to announce this upcoming show at the Sugarman Peterson Gallery.

It’s been an exciting venture to work with gallery owners Michael and Christie Sugarman, and their enthusiasm feeds the creative spirit. They have been representing my work in Santa Fe for a year now and, to celebrate the anniversary of our collaboration, we are putting on a show !

The Master Carver's Tea 72

Master Carver’s Tea   Oil on Panel   24 x 30

 

Spurned on, artistically speaking, by John O’Hern’s words, in this summer’s cover article in AAC magazine, I took the challenge to explore the “Figurative” muses which have been nudging just over my shoulder for a while now.

The Bogcutter 72

The Bogcutter   Oil on Panel   28 x 34

 

The blog entry from June explains the origin of the nudge…Click Here to Read

And here we are, after an intensive period of weeks of complete immersion at the easel, I’ve begun the journey… which has been patiently waiting for me all along.

the sheets

Bringing in the Sheets   Oil on Panel   24 x 18

 

The other part of this adventure is that Herself and I will get to tag along with these paintings and hitch a ride out to New Mexico. Our bestest pals D and S are going to introduce us to their new wild west homestead and escort us to the Santa Fe opening, which will be Friday, October 3rd from 5-7:30 at the Sugarman Peterson Gallery. If, by chance, you find yourself in the high desert please stop by and say hello. We will be eager to meet new faces and seasoned patrons alike.

There are two more paintings which are drying in the wings…I’ll put them up here soon.
Stay tuned and stay frosty my friends…the winds of change are freshening out there !

 

 


Second Time Around…

See, you never know…I was surprised, when I had to search my own blog to jog the memory banks, that it was four years ago when the hubcap arrived at my studio door.
If you click on the images below it will take you on the journey which that dear Chevy disc traveled, from side of the road, where the imagination of Ken Marquis picked it, and about a thousand other hubcaps, up…and had an idea, The Landfill Art Project.

Then,

hubcap-arrives

to the hands of this artist,

hubcap-e1290437669712

and the whims of the muses,

the-mechanic-detail72

to … a MUSEUM ?

Yes, that’s right. That thoughtful, coffee swilling mechanic was tagged to be in select  group of hubcaps, which were chosen to represent the Landfill Project …Over a thousand hubcaps which were painted and welded and sandblasted and otherwise tweaked by hundreds of different artists from around the world.

The Museum of the Shenandoah Valley is the opening venue for this touring show.
Here’s a link to their website page… Click Here

Second Time Around: The Hubcap as Art will Open this coming weekend, September 7th with an opening party on the 6th.

They have a video  trailer for the exhibition and I’m posting the link here… Hubcap Art Video

As Ted would say… ” that’s sorta fun”
and I’m honored to be included in the launch of this very “green” and groovy project. There are some wild and crazy,  and thought provoking, interpretations on the theme which were well worth putting down the wrench, pouring a cup of coffee and sitting down at the computer for a restful purusal between oil changes.

You just never know.


Fair Week

The-Grange

It’s fair week on the Vineyard.
An agricultural throw back to the old thyme days of preserves and pies and pig races and winning flower arrangements.
I’ve heard the pigs are out this year, lemurs are in ?
And I’ve got some preserving of my own to do around here.

But somehow, some day, it’s on my bucket list
to attend the fair.


Racing through the summer…

Today was the perfect summer day.
A cool morning spent waiting for the sunlight, to break through the ash tree’s canopy, and  settle just where I wanted it on the clotheslines, which had been strung with a white cotton sheet, and clipped with Ted’s pin…Herself, as model, went about watering the garden beds in between bursts of light, and I spent the time picking asparagus beetles off of the fronds.

Then, Finn and Herself headed up to the park for a walk, while I headed inside to work up the sketch, and review the photos, before a quick sanding on the studio porch to get the panel ready.

Then I heard the beep of a text to ask if I wanted ice cream for lunch…and off we went for a beautiful drive through the high summer hills and that rich creamy Reeser’s cone of bliss.

Then a spur of the moment stop at the Old Trail Variety Store on the way home, where we always find something we don’t need but might someday find it’s way into a painting or two. Today it was a couple of old hand forged cooking tools and some impossibly deep red drinking glasses. Stay tuned there.

Home to a dry panel ready for the first pass of paint, and a chat with neighbor Sue who was kindly mowing our lawn and smiling at her grandchildren who had arrived to swim and romp through her yard like kids used to do on a summer’s day. And off went She Who Must Swim, up to the lake, for her afternoon adventures.

A few hours of peaceful painting…and now it is late, but the sky refuses to give up the day, and, having checked in with the Vineyard Gazette for news of the island, I read that today was the running of the Chilmark Road Race.

Since this year’s show included the painting, The Road Race, I thought it was time to check back in here and connect those dots.

The Road Race

I just love the hometown feeling of this summer island event. And the winners get 5 lb lobsters ! That almost makes me want to…well…no. But here’s a taste of victory…

Pot Luck

I’m headed home now, the log cabin is hosting movie night and I’m in charge of the popcorn. Here’s hoping you have had at least a handful of these summer days to add to the memories…
Here’s a link to the full article about the race, but I’ve copied it here to read.

Click Here to Read Article…

Fleet Feet And Tradition Are Heart of Chilmark Road Race

  • Ivy Ashe
  • Saturday, August 9, 2014 – 6:14pm

- See more at: http://mvgazette.com/news/2014/08/09/fleet-feet-and-tradition-are-heart-chilmark-road-race?k=vg537f3e3453436#sthash.5bf82Ivt.dpuf

Sheridan Wilbur, 17, of North Smithfield, R.I., woke up at 5:20 on the morning of the 37th annual Chilmark Road Race. She piled into a car with her family and they drove to Woods Hole. There was a bus from the parking lot, the boat ride over, a bus to Chilmark and finally a bus to the starting line of the race.

After that Sheridan needed only her feet, crossing the finish line in a brisk 18:24.55 to earn the top women’s time in the race, placing 13tth overall. Though the rising high school senior has taken first place in her age group before in her four years of running the route, she’d never won the whole thing. But on Saturday morning, she finished with both a victory and a personal best.

“I was running with another woman for the first two miles,” she said after the win. “I started to break away from her then.” The famous hills of the topographically challenging race start to appear at about that point, but as Sheridan said, “As soon as you get to the top, you have the ocean view and you think, oh, the finish is close.

“It was cool just to break the tape.”

David Melly, 21, of Newton, knows exactly what it’s like to break the tape too. The winner of the 2011 race, Mr. Melly blazed to a sub-16-minute finish (15:43.31) to take first place once again. A rising senior at Cornell University, where he competes on the cross country and track squads, Mr. Melly said his familiarity with the course helped secure the win.

“In this race I was pretty much just chilling in second place until the last mile,” he said. “The hills become your friend. You can use them to your advantage.” In the final stretch, everyone has the same advantage: the packs of cheering spectators on both sides of the road, forming a veritable tunnel of support.

“That’s so much fun,” Mr. Melly said. “More than anything else, I think that’s why I keep doing this. It’s the best finish. It’s very, very gratifying.”

As per tradition, the winners of the men’s and women’s races collected massive five-pound lobsters from Larsen’s Fish Market as their prizes. The winners of the kids’ divisions each earned a pair of chicken lobsters. When nine-year-old Jack Lionette of Chilmark stepped up to collect his first-place lobsters, race organizer Hugh Weisman noted the “pretty amazing” time nine-year-old Jack had run: 19:58.

“Holy smokes,” someone in the crowd said. “Damn,” said another.

Jack, who also won his age division last year, said he was “definitely trying to break sub-20,” and had been “sprinting the whole way.” He credited part of his success to a pre-race dinner of spaghetti and meatballs, and ultimately has his sights set on the course record itself (14:38).

Though Jack was the youngest Vineyarder to cross the line first, Michael Schroeder, 19, of West Tisbury took the top overall spot for Islanders, finishing 11th with a time of 18:14.8. Emma Mushnick, 26, of Vineyard Haven, posted the fastest Vineyard time in the women’s race, running a 20:46.85 to take 61st overall and third in her age group.

This year’s field was the largest in race history, with more than 1,600 entrants completing the 5K course. Some were familiar faces, like the purple-shirted MacMaster clan from Pennsylvania. This year, 29 MacMasters took part in the day’s events.

“This year we’re stretching it into in laws,” Keegan Skidmore, 31, said before the race. Mr. Skidmore is himself a recent MacMaster in law, and did the family proud by placing seventh overall and second in his age group.

One group wore pink tutus and matching antennae-like headbands, which complemented the official black race shirts they wore.

“It’s our 10th year running it this year,” said Jessica Donahue. “Last year, when we were running it we decided we needed to do something special.”

But whether a competitor, a spectator or a volunteer, everyone at the Chilmark Road Race finds a way to make it their own.

Susan Brown of Edgartown hadn’t run the race since 1980.

“Today I am 70 years old, one month and one day,” she said. “My goal was to finish, and finish in under an hour. And I did it. I’m still standing.” Then she was off to collect her award, for placing third in her age group, before heading home to celebrate the milestone.

Nathalia Garroway, (22 months old) wearing a floppy sun hat and too-big race shirt, toddled across the finish line with her parents Christopher Garroway and Nadia Popova.

Mr. Garroway and Ms. Popova had intended to bring their two-month-old along as well, ultimately deciding it was too hot for the infant to be outside. But Nathalia was up to the challenge.

“She only stopped once to pick some flowers,” Mr. Garroway said.